Filtering by: WORKSHOP

Oct
28
6:00 PM18:00

Talking About Racism: Unmasking the Elephant in the Room

Doors at 5:30 pm; Event at 6:00 pm in the Back Room

Tickets are $5 - $150 sliding scale
Attend 2 workshops for $25

black-whites-together-arms-hands.jpg

The Talking about Racism: Unmasking the Elephant in the Room - A series of six interactive and progressive workshops exploring racism in contemporary American society.

American racism is at the foundation of our partisan political system and is the factor most responsible for the election and popularity of our current president.   Systemically embedded in the original fabric of the “promised” democratic freedoms, racism has morphed from the overt de jure discrimination of enslavement and Jim Crow into a sophisticated state and federal apparatus that uses brutality, imprisonment and legislation to keep its “colored” populations under control.  The rise and “official” sanction of White nationalism, the backlash that is terrorizing immigrants and contracting U.S. immigration policies, the growing inequalities in wealth, political representation, educational opportunities, and access to employment, healthcare and housing between people of color and whites indicates a rising wave of regression and repression that undermines democratic ideals and diminishes the freedom of all.  America is not in a “post-racial” stage of development and the election of Barack Obama was not the “triumph” of a colorblind American culture.

 Science has destroyed the biological myth of race.  As an American society, we continue to allow racism to divide us to our peril. The climate crisis, the rise of the business oligarchs and the proliferation of technology all predict a future where cooperation and community are critical.  These workshops will explore the concepts underlying the idea and reality of race and racism in America. The political and historic footprint of racism will be traced and we will look at the policies and practices that have kept racism alive and well in American society.  We will address our own attitudes, implicit biases and family stories.  We will focus on what it means to become anti-racist and explore conversational approaches to talking about race with our neighbors and friends.  These workshops are open to people of all backgrounds.

Each workshop will be experiential and complete in its entirety.  The series is intended to build on the knowledge base of each segment but participants can come to workshops sequentially or to individual sessions.

Timeslot – 3 hours

Session One – The development of the Atlantic Slave Trade and the notion of race – the making of a myth – racism as a tool of labor management, the invention of Whiteness – 

Implicit Bias and the development of racialized identity

What is race talk – dynamics and characteristics of

Why don’t we talk about race – protocols, avoidance strategies?

Session Two – Master Narrative vs Back Story – how are perceptions shaped?

Family stories

Vulnerability

Micro-aggressions – identify, use and function – Practice

Session Three –Color Blind is Color Mute – the myth of meritocracy – who is an immigrant?

Stereotypes and Power Evasion

Equity vs Equality – Systemic Inequities

Session Four – The “new racism” – Exploring the idea of a “Post racial” America

White rage – Voter suppression, mass incarceration/the re-segregation of schools

Issues for Black/POC participants – Issues for White participants

Community Building

Session Five: Guidelines, Conditions and Solutions for Honest Racial Dialogues

Having Difficult Discussions, Processing new information, self-compassion

Talking to children about racism

Session Six: Building Lasting Bridges – Where are we now and where can we go?

Identifying and Targeting Racism

In our family circles

In our institutions and affiliations

How we invest and spend our money

Practicing what we preach – Family circles – next steps

Wrap us - Evaluation

 

 

 

 

           

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Ann-Ellice Parker is a death educator and counselor. She is the owner of Seasons of Change, an end of life training and consulting company. She worked for 25 years as a health educator specializing in reproductive health and HIV prevention education. She brings a lifetime of political activism to her current anti-racism work. She is the proud grandmother of two, who believes that “We who believe in freedom cannot rest”.

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International Body Music Festival MiniFest
Oct
19
8:30 PM20:30

International Body Music Festival MiniFest

Doors open 8pm / MiniFest Starts at 8:30pm

$18 Advance / $20 Day of Show / $15 Students and Seniors

Buy Tickets Here


PASS IT AROUND - a participatory interactive World Body Music mash-up


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The participatory/interactive PASS IT AROUND engages the audience in dynamic, culturally specific and collaborative Body Music styles at Ashkenaz. With IBMF house band Corposonic Trio featuring Artistic Director and Body Musician Keith Terry, bass singer Bryan Dyer, and beatboxer Steve Hogan, the event features Balinese Kecak from Dewa Berata; Stepping from Antwan Davis; South Indian Solkatu from Jim Santi Owen; Contemporary Body Music from Evie Ladin’s MoToR/dance, flamenco from Clara Rodriguez y AguaClara Flamenco, The Ranky Tanky from Rhonda Benin, and Balkan Dance from Ivan Velev and Sean Tergis.. This dynamic and experiential evening will follow the successful model Keith Terry and the IBMF have utilized in previous global Festivals in Paris, France and São Paulo, Brazil.

More info about the weekend MiniFest here: http://www.internationalbodymusicfestival.com/minifests.shtml

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Step and Body Percussion Special Workshop with Antwan Davis!
Oct
13
12:00 PM12:00

Step and Body Percussion Special Workshop with Antwan Davis!

Workshop from 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm

Tickets are $20

Buy Tickets Here

Antwan.jpg

This beginner/intermediate Stepping and Body percussion class will challenge your body and mind with elemets of Greek collegiate stepping and stomp style body percussion.

You will receive the elements to make you own steps in this very interactive workshop!

Stomp and StepAfrika Alumnus Antwan Davis is a co creator of Molodi, and featured performer at the 2016 and 2018 International Body Music Festival.

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Aug
26
6:00 PM18:00

Talking About Racism: Unmasking the Elephant in the Room

Doors at 5:30 pm; Event at 6:00 pm in the Back Room

Tickets are $5 - $150 sliding scale
Attend 3 workshops for $40
Attend 2 workshops for $25

black-whites-together-arms-hands.jpg

The Talking about Racism: Unmasking the Elephant in the Room - A series of six interactive and progressive workshops exploring racism in contemporary American society.

She was 18 years old and drop dead gorgeous waiting for a train. Out of nowhere she is assaulted by a deranged man.   He slashes her throat and her accompanying sister is viciously stabbed. Within minutes, this young African American woman lies dead on the platform. Her accompanying sister lies in a pool of blood, and dozens of horrified spectators are traumatized. The offender, a random white man, gets away.  This is Oakland, California, July, 2018.

Twenty-first century racism has been repackaged, remaining deadly and ubiquitous.  Lynching has been replaced by the continuous, brutal murder of unarmed Black men and women in the custody of the state. Unwritten Jim Crow laws and policies are enforced by “citizen vigilantes”   taking matters into their own hands or calling in agents of the state when “uppity” Black folks dare to penetrate public or private “white spaces” .  Hate crimes have tripled in the last 5 years. The President is separating families at the border, denying the Dreamers sanctuary, disparaging all People of Color. The wealth differential between People of Color and whites continues to widen, while life expectancy for People of Color remains a full 8-10 years less than that of whites.   Runaway capitalism benefits the top 1% only, and systemic racism is upheld by every person remaining unaware, silent or too busy to become involved in dismantling a system that dehumanizes whites and every person of color within its borders.

Talking about racism can be challenging. Come out to discuss strategies for change. Get tools for personal transformation and the support of community. 

 Science has destroyed the biological myth of race.  As an American society, we continue to allow racism to divide us to our peril. The climate crisis, the rise of the business oligarchs and the proliferation of technology all predict a future where cooperation and community are critical.  These workshops will explore the concepts underlying the idea and reality of race and racism in America. The political and historic footprint of racism will be traced and we will look at the policies and practices that have kept racism alive and well in American society.  We will address our own attitudes, implicit biases and family stories.  We will focus on what it means to become anti-racist and explore conversational approaches to talking about race with our neighbors and friends.  These workshops are open to people of all backgrounds.

Each workshop will be experiential and complete in its entirety.  The series is intended to build on the knowledge base of each segment but participants can come to workshops sequentially or to individual sessions.

Timeslot – 3 hours

Session One – The development of the Atlantic Slave Trade and the notion of race – the making of a myth – racism as a tool of labor management, the invention of Whiteness – 

Implicit Bias and the development of racialized identity

What is race talk – dynamics and characteristics of

Why don’t we talk about race – protocols, avoidance strategies?

Session Two – Master Narrative vs Back Story – how are perceptions shaped?

Family stories

Vulnerability

Micro-aggressions – identify, use and function – Practice

Session Three –Color Blind is Color Mute – the myth of meritocracy – who is an immigrant?

Stereotypes and Power Evasion

Equity vs Equality – Systemic Inequities

Session Four – The “new racism” – Exploring the idea of a “Post racial” America

White rage – Voter suppression, mass incarceration/the re-segregation of schools

Issues for Black/POC participants – Issues for White participants

Community Building

Session Five: Guidelines, Conditions and Solutions for Honest Racial Dialogues

Having Difficult Discussions, Processing new information, self-compassion

Talking to children about racism

Session Six: Building Lasting Bridges – Where are we now and where can we go?

Identifying and Targeting Racism

In our family circles

In our institutions and affiliations

How we invest and spend our money

Practicing what we preach – Family circles – next steps

Wrap up - Evaluation

 

 

 

 

           

photo.jpg

Ann-Ellice Parker is a death educator and counselor. She is the owner of Seasons of Change, an end of life training and consulting company. She worked for 25 years as a health educator specializing in reproductive health and HIV prevention education. She brings a lifetime of political activism to her current anti-racism work. She is the proud grandmother of two, who believes that “We who believe in freedom cannot rest”.

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Jun
24
6:00 PM18:00

Talking About Racism: Unmasking the Elephant in the Room

Doors at 5:30 pm; Event at 6:00 pm in the Back Room

Tickets are $15
Attend all four workshops for $50
Attend 3 workshops for $40
Attend 2 workshops for $25

black-whites-together-arms-hands.jpg

The Talking about Racism: Unmasking the Elephant in the Room - A series of six interactive and progressive workshops exploring racism in contemporary American society.

These workshops are designed to stand alone as singular presentations, as well as building upon info shared. A single workshop is valuable, the series is constructed to shift the paradigms of our current racial identities.  This is an in-depth exploration of racism as manifested in present day U.S. society.

JUNE WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION:
We will further explore the legacy of chattel slavery and its impact on the institutions, politics and cultural fabric of America. How do individual attitudes and actions contribute to or disrupt centuries old patterns of systemic discrimination and inequity?  How can we develop a common vocabulary and protocols to identify and disconnect from White supremacist doctrine and practice?  What are ways to develop alliances and mutually supportive networks to dismantle racism and to address state sanctioned police violence against Black and all people of color?  Come out to discover ways you can be the change you want to see!

SERIES DESCRIPTION:
American racism is at the foundation of our partisan political system and is the factor most responsible for the election and popularity of our current president.   Systemically embedded in the original fabric of the “promised” democratic freedoms, racism has morphed from the overt de jure discrimination of enslavement and Jim Crow into a sophisticated state and federal apparatus that uses brutality, imprisonment and legislation to keep its “colored” populations under control.  The rise and “official” sanction of White nationalism, the backlash that is terrorizing immigrants and contracting U.S. immigration policies, the growing inequalities in wealth, political representation, educational opportunities, and access to employment, healthcare and housing between people of color and whites indicates a rising wave of regression and repression that undermines democratic ideals and diminishes the freedom of all.  America is not in a “post-racial” stage of development and the election of Barack Obama was not the “triumph” of a colorblind American culture.

 Science has destroyed the biological myth of race.  As an American society, we continue to allow racism to divide us to our peril. The climate crisis, the rise of the business oligarchs and the proliferation of technology all predict a future where cooperation and community are critical.  These workshops will explore the concepts underlying the idea and reality of race and racism in America. The political and historic footprint of racism will be traced and we will look at the policies and practices that have kept racism alive and well in American society.  We will address our own attitudes, implicit biases and family stories.  We will focus on what it means to become anti-racist and explore conversational approaches to talking about race with our neighbors and friends.  These workshops are open to people of all backgrounds.

Each workshop will be experiential and complete in its entirety.  The series is intended to build on the knowledge base of each segment but participants can come to workshops sequentially or to individual sessions.

Timeslot – 3 hours

Session One – The development of the Atlantic Slave Trade and the notion of race – the making of a myth – racism as a tool of labor management, the invention of Whiteness – 

Implicit Bias and the development of racialized identity

What is race talk – dynamics and characteristics of

Why don’t we talk about race – protocols, avoidance strategies?

Session Two – Master Narrative vs Back Story – how are perceptions shaped?

Family stories

Vulnerability

Micro-aggressions – identify, use and function – Practice

Session Three –Color Blind is Color Mute – the myth of meritocracy – who is an immigrant?

Stereotypes and Power Evasion

Equity vs Equality – Systemic Inequities

Session Four – The “new racism” – Exploring the idea of a “Post racial” America

White rage – Voter suppression, mass incarceration/the re-segregation of schools

Issues for Black/POC participants – Issues for White participants

Community Building

Session Five: Guidelines, Conditions and Solutions for Honest Racial Dialogues

Having Difficult Discussions, Processing new information, self-compassion

Talking to children about racism

Session Six: Building Lasting Bridges – Where are we now and where can we go?

Identifying and Targeting Racism

In our family circles

In our institutions and affiliations

How we invest and spend our money

Practicing what we preach – Family circles – next steps

Wrap us - Evaluation

 

 

 

 

           

photo.jpg

Ann-Ellice Parker is a death educator and counselor. She is the owner of Seasons of Change, an end of life training and consulting company. She worked for 25 years as a health educator specializing in reproductive health and HIV prevention education. She brings a lifetime of political activism to her current anti-racism work. She is the proud grandmother of two, who believes that “We who believe in freedom cannot rest”.

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Chirgilchin Throat Singing Workshop
May
27
3:30 PM15:30

Chirgilchin Throat Singing Workshop

Doors at 3:00 pm; Workshop at 3:30 PM

Tickets are $40 at the Door

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Here is your chance to learn the ancient art of Tuvan throat singing from the world renowned members of Chirgilchin. Our teachers, Igor Koshkendey, Mongun-ool Ondar, and Aidyn Byrtaan-ool have been recognized as masters of throat singing, and they hold multiple international throat singing awards and honors. In this two-hour introductory workshop students will be split into small groups and cover the main techniques and styles of throat singing, including khoomei, sygyt, and kargyraa. All ages and skill levels are welcome.

Instructors: Igor Koshkendey In 1998, Igor took the top prize at the International Competition of Throat Singing in Kyzyl, Tuva’s capital. During Chirgilchin’s second international tour, Igor won the Grand Prix at the Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod in Llangollen, North Wales. He went on to win the International Competition of Throat Singing in Tuva again in 2002. Igor is known around the world for his mastery of multiple styles of throat singing, and especially for being the only throat singer to master the techniques first invented by legendary throat singer Vladimir Oidupaa. Today, Igor directs the Tuvan Cultural Center for traditional arts, in addition to performing with Chirgilchin. His illustrious musical career shows no sign of slowing down - in 2017 he won Best Urban Song in the Latin Grammy Awards for his collaboration with Puerto Rican musician Residente.

Mongun-ool Ondar Mongun-ool began studying throat singing at the age of 13, and went on to win the International Competition of Throat Singing at the age of 16. He is recognized as a master of all six styles of throat singing, and has developed a new style of his own. His incredible solos can express and inspire profound feelings of tragic sadness or blissful joy, with a complexity that would astound John Coltrane or Jimi Hendrix. His singing is, without a doubt, guaranteed to blow your mind.

Aidyn Byrtaan-ool Aidyn studied under the late Kongar-ool Ondar, who held the esteemed honors of People's Throat Singer of the Republic of Tuva, and Honored Artist of Russia. Under the direction of Mr. Ondar and as a member of the folk ensemble Ertine, Aidyn performed at international festivals in Germany and France, and competed in national competitions at home and abroad. Today, Aidyn is a soloist in the Tuvan National Folk Orchestra and a member of Chirgilchin. He commands a high level of professionalism in all traditional Tuvan instruments, and is a laureate of multiple international throat singing competitions and symposiums.

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Apr
29
6:00 PM18:00

Talking About Racism: Unmasking the Elephant in the Room

Doors at 5:30 pm; Event at 6:00 pm in the Back Room

Tickets are $5 to $150 Sliding Scale
No one turned away for lack of funds.

Attend all four workshops for $50
Attend 3 workshops for $40
Attend 2 workshops for $25

April 29, June 24, Aug 26, Oct 28, Dec 30


 

black-whites-together-arms-hands.jpg

The Talking about Racism: Unmasking the Elephant in the Room - A series of six interactive and progressive workshops exploring racism in contemporary American society.

American racism is at the foundation of our partisan political system and is the factor most responsible for the election and popularity of our current president.   Systemically embedded in the original fabric of the “promised” democratic freedoms, racism has morphed from the overt de jure discrimination of enslavement and Jim Crow into a sophisticated state and federal apparatus that uses brutality, imprisonment and legislation to keep its “colored” populations under control.  The rise and “official” sanction of White nationalism, the backlash that is terrorizing immigrants and contracting U.S. immigration policies, the growing inequalities in wealth, political representation, educational opportunities, and access to employment, healthcare and housing between people of color and whites indicates a rising wave of regression and repression that undermines democratic ideals and diminishes the freedom of all.  America is not in a “post-racial” stage of development and the election of Barack Obama was not the “triumph” of a colorblind American culture.

 Science has destroyed the biological myth of race.  As an American society, we continue to allow racism to divide us to our peril. The climate crisis, the rise of the business oligarchs and the proliferation of technology all predict a future where cooperation and community are critical.  These workshops will explore the concepts underlying the idea and reality of race and racism in America. The political and historic footprint of racism will be traced and we will look at the policies and practices that have kept racism alive and well in American society.  We will address our own attitudes, implicit biases and family stories.  We will focus on what it means to become anti-racist and explore conversational approaches to talking about race with our neighbors and friends.  These workshops are open to people of all backgrounds.

Each workshop will be experiential and complete in its entirety.  The series is intended to build on the knowledge base of each segment but participants can come to workshops sequentially or to individual sessions.

Timeslot – 3 hours

Session One – The development of the Atlantic Slave Trade and the notion of race – the making of a myth – racism as a tool of labor management, the invention of Whiteness – 

Implicit Bias and the development of racialized identity

What is race talk – dynamics and characteristics of

Why don’t we talk about race – protocols, avoidance strategies?

Session Two – Master Narrative vs Back Story – how are perceptions shaped?

Family stories

Vulnerability

Micro-aggressions – identify, use and function – Practice

Session Three –Color Blind is Color Mute – the myth of meritocracy – who is an immigrant?

Stereotypes and Power Evasion

Equity vs Equality – Systemic Inequities

Session Four – The “new racism” – Exploring the idea of a “Post racial” America

White rage – Voter suppression, mass incarceration/the re-segregation of schools

Issues for Black/POC participants – Issues for White participants

Community Building

Session Five: Guidelines, Conditions and Solutions for Honest Racial Dialogues

Having Difficult Discussions, Processing new information, self-compassion

Talking to children about racism

Session Six: Building Lasting Bridges – Where are we now and where can we go?

Identifying and Targeting Racism

In our family circles

In our institutions and affiliations

How we invest and spend our money

Practicing what we preach – Family circles – next steps

Wrap us - Evaluation

 

 

 

 

           

photo.jpg

Ann-Ellice Parker is a death educator and counselor. She is the owner of Seasons of Change, an end of life training and consulting company. She worked for 25 years as a health educator specializing in reproductive health and HIV prevention education. She brings a lifetime of political activism to her current anti-racism work. She is the proud grandmother of two, who believes that “We who believe in freedom cannot rest”.

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Marimba Workshop with Sheree Seretse and members of Anzanga Marimba Ensemble
Apr
8
5:30 PM17:30

Marimba Workshop with Sheree Seretse and members of Anzanga Marimba Ensemble

Event at 5:30 pm in the Back Studio

Ticket are $20 - LIMIT of 12 People
Buy Tickets Here

RHYTHMS AND MELODIES OF ZIMBABWE Come learn the exhilarating rhythms and melodies of the marimba. These danceable and infectious sounds are from the Shona people of Zimbabwe. The ensemble of marimbas provides an orchestral experience like no other. The deep gut felt sounds of the bass will provide the backbone of the ensemble, the sopranos drives the melodies and tenors and baritones will provide delicious compliment. If you can move your wrists and have ears you can learn how to play. Classes will be geared to experience level. Come join the fun. ALL LEVELS WELCOME

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Sheree Seretse, Director of the Anzanga, Shumba Youth and Zambuko Marimba Ensembles has been teaching, studying and performing for over 40 years. Affectionately known as “mama marimba”, Sheree’s passion and drive for Zimbabwean Marimba music shines through the five recordings she has produced and numerous other recordings on which she made appearances. 

Sheree received her initial training through renowned musician and composer Dumisani “Dumi” Maraire. She has facilitated many workshops around the country and has toured extensively around the globe. 

Sheree believes that marimba music is accessible to everyone.

 

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Get Down on the Blues with Faye Carol
Mar
18
4:00 PM16:00

Get Down on the Blues with Faye Carol

Doors at 3:30 pm; Show at 4:00 pm

Tickets are $20 at the Door

Faye Carol 1.jpg

Blues master Faye Carol has shared the stage with Albert King, Lowell Fulson, Charles Brown, & many more. Learn about the many grooves and regional sounds of the blues and explore how you can Get Down on the blues too. Open to all!

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Songs to the Female Orishas - Song Workshop by Bobi Cespedes
Mar
11
4:00 PM16:00

Songs to the Female Orishas - Song Workshop by Bobi Cespedes

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT

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As part of the Maestra Series, renowned singer and folklorist Bobi Céspedes returns to Ashkenaz to lead another workshop on the chants to the female deities found in the Yoruba spiritual tradition known as Lucumí in Cuba. The Orisha represent divine forces manifested through nature and are summoned through music, song and dance. Bobi is one of the very few female akpwóns (lead singer of the Lucumí ceremonial music), providing a remarkable opportunity to learn from a distinguished priestess and elder in the tradition. Bobi will supplement what she covered in last year’s popular class by including different chants and Orishas, such as Oyá, a female warrior representing the wind. This workshop is suited for both practitioners and those interested in Cuban music since the influence of Orisha music permeates Cuban popular music and dance. No previous experience necessary. The chants are sung in a call and response pattern, giving everyone the opportunity to join in praise of the feminine goddesses of nature.

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Talking About Racism: The "Elephant" in the Room
Feb
25
6:00 PM18:00

Talking About Racism: The "Elephant" in the Room

Doors at 5:30 pm; Event at 6:00 pm in the Back Room

Tickets are $15

black-whites-together-arms-hands.jpg

“Race” or the idea that people of different ethnicities and cultures are fundamentally different is not supported by science. “Racism” or the systematic oppression and regulation of ethnic groups based on the fiction of “race” is endemic to the culture, politics, traditions and legal structure of the U.S. In a nation built on the labor of enslaved Africans, the inequalities in justice, housing, healthcare, employment and education between Black people and White people have never been greater. Now, when the election of the current president has given license to the expression of hate – how can we begin to have dialogues that explore common interests? How can we speak to each other without denigration and accusation? Where can we learn tools for communication and community building? This workshop will address why we don’t talk about race and offer positive strategies to begin dialogues with family and friends. Open to people of all backgrounds, we will explore the mono-ethnic perspective that overshadows (and dehumanizes) our social, economic and political relationships, and model new ways of appreciating the richness of our multi-ethnic heritage and experience.

photo.jpg

Ann-Ellice Parker is a death educator and counselor. She is the owner of Seasons of Change, an end of life training and consulting company. She worked for 25 years as a health educator specializing in reproductive health and HIV prevention education. She brings a lifetime of political activism to her current anti-racism work. She is the proud grandmother of two, who believes that “We who believe in freedom cannot rest”.

View Event →
Talking About Race: The “Elephant” in the Room
Nov
26
2:00 PM14:00

Talking About Race: The “Elephant” in the Room

Doors at 1:30 pm, Event at 2 pm in the Back Studio

Eventbrite - Talking About Race

Tickets Are $15 - $100
Sliding Scale, No one turned away.

bw-hands1.jpg

“Race” or the idea that people of different ethnicities and cultures are fundamentally different is not supported by science. “Racism” or the systematic oppression and regulation of ethnic groups based on the fiction of “race” is endemic to the culture, politics, traditions and legal structure of the U.S. In a nation built on the labor of enslaved Africans, the inequalities in justice, housing, healthcare, employment and education between Black people and White people have never been greater. Now, when the election of the current president has given license to the expression of hate – how can we begin to have dialogues that explore common interests? How can we speak to each other without denigration and accusation? Where can we learn tools for communication and community building? This workshop will address why we don’t talk about race and offer positive strategies to begin dialogues with family and friends. Open to people of all backgrounds, we will explore the mono-ethnic perspective that overshadows (and dehumanizes) our social, economic and political relationships, and model new ways of appreciating the richness of our multi-ethnic heritage and experience.

photo.jpg

Ann-Ellice Parker is a death educator and counselor. She is the owner of Seasons of Change, an end of life training and consulting company. She worked for 25 years as a health educator specializing in reproductive health and HIV prevention education. She brings a lifetime of political activism to her current anti-racism work. She is the proud grandmother of two, who believes that “We who believe in freedom cannot rest”.

View Event →