Filtering by: ZIMBABWEAN

Piwai plus Adrian West Band
Oct
12
8:30 PM20:30

Piwai plus Adrian West Band

Doors at 8pm ; Show at 8:30pm

Tickets are $15 Advance / $18 Day of Show

Buy Tickets Here

Piwai combines the sounds of her Zimbabwean homeland with her original songs about Africa, struggles both political and personal, love and hope. In her music Piwai describes her musical journey, the challenges she faces in the American music industry, and how her dreams told her to follow the mbira. In early 2012, Piwai recorded her first album, “African Turquoise,” in collaboration with James Buzuzi of Bongo Love. It fuses jazz and traditional African rhythms, including mbira and percussion from Bongo Love’s Jacob Mafuleni and John Mambira. As with her album concept, Piwai’s concerts take the listener on a journey: glimpse life through the eyes of children in war-torn Congo; walk the streets of Harare; bear witness to the slums of Soweto, India, and the favelas of Brazil; or play along the proverbial paths of Zimbabwean folklore. For Piwai, music is all-encompassing: “The sum total of my very existence and every action I make manifests in music – the rhythm of my life.”

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Piwai was surrounded by music from an early age. Her first influences include music from the Shona and Ndebele people of Zimbabwe, Suthu and Zulu tribes, and the Zimbabwean Catholic Church. She joined her first choir at the age of 10, wrote her first song at 13, and hasn’t stopped since. Piwai went on to study with renowned percussionists Yagbe Onilu and Butch Haynes, trained vocally at the Jazz School of Berkeley, and delved into the mbira – a traditional African instrument associated with profound spiritual union – with maestro Cosmas Magaya.

Adrian West

Ask him what kind of music The Adrian West Band plays and Adrian will answer "Yes." Or if he's feeling cocky, he'll answer "Good."

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The long answer: a catchy mix of original songs and instrumentals that hover between acoustic rock, classical and West-African styles. Their songs have drawn such diverse comparisons as Paul Simon and Nelly McKay, artists seldom mentioned in the same breath.

Born and raised in Montreal, Canada, Adrian is an exciting performer to watch. He sings in an uplifting, almost child-like voice as he moves effortlessy between guitar & violin, often using live looping to add layers of sound (and intrigue) to his songs. He's not afraid to tackle difficult topics in his songwriting; Safe Streets tells an allegory about police violence, Close Your Eyes laments the beauty bias that pervades in the mass media, and Senses implores that you enjoy your senses while you can. Despite this philosophical streak, Adrian's lyrics are infused with a sense of hope and a touch of whimsy. The band features vocal harmonies, guitar, electric violin, bass, drums, and live "looping”.

 

Adrian started playing violin at the age of four and in his teens studied classical violin at the McGill Conservatory of Music in Montreal. He later learned to play drums, guitar and developed his vocal and songwriting technique.

He moved to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1995 where as a sideman violinist he began supporting local Bay Area bands, playing some of the area's better known venues including the Fillmore, Yoshi's SF (main stage), Slim’s, The Independent and The Sweetwater.

In 2005 Adrian formed the Adrian West Band and in 2010 he released his first full-length CD Chameleons and Butterflies. Since then the band has performed at small venues and festivals all over the Bay Area.

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Mafaro eZimbabwe Part 2, Branches: The KTO Project explores Chimurenga music and beyond!
Apr
21
9:00 PM21:00

Mafaro eZimbabwe Part 2, Branches: The KTO Project explores Chimurenga music and beyond!

Doors at 8:30 pm; Show at 9:00 pm

Tickets are $20 Advance /
$25 at the Door

Tickets for both shows (April 19th & 21st) also available.
$30 Advance / $40 Day of Show

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The KTO Project is collaborating with Bay Area musicians and dancers from Zimbabwe to celebrate the music of the people - Chimurenga music - and to explore its roots in traditional mbira music played by the ancestral Shona people in Zimbabwe. 

The KTO Project will bring more than 15 musicians and dancers and a community choir of up to 25 people together to perform one concert of ancestral songs of Zimbabwe, then one concert of the popular, socially impactful music developed from the ancestral forms generations later. 

The second of 2 concerts will feature Zimbabwean mbira music played with modern amplified instrumentation and drum kit, with lyrics characterized by social and political commentary. The performance will feature arrangements and song by Kelly Takunda Orphan and Zivanai Masango, The KTO Project’s Zimbabwe-born guitar player who has made his mark touring with Zimbabwean master musicians Oliver Mtukudzi and Thomas Mapfumo. 

Both concerts (the first on April 19th) will feature Voices of Zimbabwe, the community chorus led by Kelly Takunda Orphan, developed in residence at Ashkenaz (that will run from February to April 2018). Members of the Zimbabwean, Southern African and World Music choral communities have a chance to participate in this choral project that will be featured at the Mafaro eZimbabwe: Zimbabwean Mbira Music for the People concerts.

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Mafaro eZimbabwe Part 1, Roots: Traditional acoustic music from Zimbabwe
Apr
19
8:00 PM20:00

Mafaro eZimbabwe Part 1, Roots: Traditional acoustic music from Zimbabwe

Doors at 7:30 pm; Show 8:00 pm

Tickets are $15 Advance / $20.00

Tickets for both shows (April 19th & 21st) also available.
$30 Advance / $40 Day of Show

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On April 19, 2018, the first of two concerts of ancestral Zimbabwean music will feature traditional mbira music: drumming, marimba, dance and choral music. Audiences will enjoy the transformative sound of mbira music as it was played over one thousand years ago in traditional ceremonies in Zimbabwe.

The KTO Project is collaborating with Bay Area musicians and dancers from Zimbabwe to celebrate the music of the people - Chimurenga music - and to explore its roots in traditional mbira music played by the ancestral Shona people in Zimbabwe. 

The KTO Project will bring more than 15 musicians and dancers and a community choir of up to 25 people together to perform one concert of ancestral songs of Zimbabwe, then one concert of the popular, socially impactful music developed from the ancestral forms generations later.  

A second concert, on April 21, 2018, will feature Zimbabwean mbira music played with modern amplified instrumentation and drum kit, with lyrics characterized by social and political commentary. The performance will feature arrangements and song by Kelly Takunda Orphan and Zivanai Masango.

Both concerts will feature Voices of Zimbabwe, the community chorus led by Kelly Takunda Orphan, developed in residence at Ashkenaz (that will run from February to April 2018). Members of the Zimbabwean, Southern African and World Music choral communities have a chance to participate in this choral project that will be featured at the Mafaro eZimbabwe: Zimbabwean Mbira Music for the People concerts.

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Marimba Workshop with Sheree Seretse and members of Anzanga Marimba Ensemble
Apr
8
5:30 PM17:30

Marimba Workshop with Sheree Seretse and members of Anzanga Marimba Ensemble

Event at 5:30 pm in the Back Studio

Ticket are $20 - LIMIT of 12 People
Buy Tickets Here

RHYTHMS AND MELODIES OF ZIMBABWE Come learn the exhilarating rhythms and melodies of the marimba. These danceable and infectious sounds are from the Shona people of Zimbabwe. The ensemble of marimbas provides an orchestral experience like no other. The deep gut felt sounds of the bass will provide the backbone of the ensemble, the sopranos drives the melodies and tenors and baritones will provide delicious compliment. If you can move your wrists and have ears you can learn how to play. Classes will be geared to experience level. Come join the fun. ALL LEVELS WELCOME

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Sheree Seretse, Director of the Anzanga, Shumba Youth and Zambuko Marimba Ensembles has been teaching, studying and performing for over 40 years. Affectionately known as “mama marimba”, Sheree’s passion and drive for Zimbabwean Marimba music shines through the five recordings she has produced and numerous other recordings on which she made appearances. 

Sheree received her initial training through renowned musician and composer Dumisani “Dumi” Maraire. She has facilitated many workshops around the country and has toured extensively around the globe. 

Sheree believes that marimba music is accessible to everyone.

 

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Sheree Seretse and the Anzanga Marimba Ensemble
Apr
7
8:00 PM20:00

Sheree Seretse and the Anzanga Marimba Ensemble

Doors at 7:30 pm; Show at 8:00 pm

Tickets are $20 Advance / $25 at the Door

Maestra Series Packages $48 - $150

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Sheree Seretse, Director of the Anzanga, Shumba Youth and Zambuko Marimba Ensembles has been teaching, studying and performing for over 40 years. Affectionately known as “mama marimba”, Sheree’s passion and drive for Zimbabwean Marimba music shines through the five recordings she has produced and numerous other recordings on which she made appearances. 

Sheree received her initial training through renowned musician and composer Dumisani “Dumi” Maraire. She has facilitated many workshops around the country and has toured extensively around the globe. 

Sheree believes that marimba music is accessible to everyone.

Anzanga Marimba Ensemble photo.jpg

For over 20 years Anzanga has brought the electrifying energizing music of African marimba to weddings, schools, festivals, culture events and more. We draw our repertoire primarily from Zimbabwe influences from Mozambique, South Africa and Gambia, in addition to playing compositions of our own. We are based in Seattle, Washington, and have toured nationally and internationally. 
  
Our ensemble plays using eight marimbas – three Sopranos, three tenors, a baritone, and a base – and hoshos, or gourd shakers. The marimbas are handcrafted xylophones made from various hardwoods. The keys are fine-tuned to reflect tones playing African societies. Each key sits above a resonator with a vibrating membrane to amplify the sound and add a unique “buzz” to the music. 
Anzanga, which means “to our friends” draws its name and music<br>from the rich cultural heritage of Africa. We’re honored to share this joyful and vibrant music, and our goal is to entertain, enlighten and inspire all who hear us! 
  
“Anzanga always gets people up out of their seats. The kids love them, and they’re great at attracting people to the event.” 
— Rainier Chamber of Commerce

 

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